Translation Prizes – The 2013 Best Translated Book Award

The 2013 Best Translated Book Award longlist contains 25 titles.  In the coming weeks the Three Percent Blog will feature a review for every title that made the longlist, everyone interested in the prize should check it out.  Currently I’ve read and reviewed three of the books nominated and am familiar with and/or plan to read five others.

Twenty-five books is a really long list.  And an ambitious one for those planning to read all the titles – you know who you are – before the shortlist is announce on April 10th.  Initial reaction?  Too long.*  But the more I look it over the more I realize that it’s also a REALLY good list.  As per the Three Percent Blog – this year’s longlist showcases 15 different presses, books from 19 countries in 13 different languages.

  • Sergio Chejfec:  The Planets (Heather Cleary, Spanish/Argentina) Open Letter Books
  • Eric Chevillard:  Prehistoric Times (Alyson Waters, French/France) Archipelago Books
  • Mahmoud Dowlatabadi:  The Colonel (Tom Patterdale, Persian/Iran) Melville House
  • Dung Kai-Cheung: Atlas (Anders Hansson & Bonnie S. McDougall, Chinese/China) Columbia University Press
  • Dominique Eddé:  Kite (Ros Schwartz, French/Lebanon) Seagull Books
  • Tomoyuki Hoshino:  We, The Children of Cats (Brian Bergstrom & Lucy Fraser, Japanese/Japan) PM Press
  • Michel Houellebecq:  The Map and the Territory (Gavin Bowd, French/France) Knopf
  • Intizar Husain:  Basti (Frances W. Pritchett, Urdu/Pakistan) New York Review Books
  • Miljenko Jergović:  Mama Leone (David Williams, Croation/Croatia) Archipelago Books
  • Gert Jonke:  Awakening to the Great Sleep War (Jean M. Snook, German/Austria) Dalkey Archive Press
  • Karl Knausgaard:  My Struggle: Book One (Don Bartlett, Norwegian/Norway) Archipelago Books
  • László Krasznahorkai:  Satantango (George Szirtes, Hungarian/Huganry) New Directions
  • Edouard Levé:  Autoportrait (Lorin Stein, French/France)  Dalkey Archive Press
  • Clarice Lispector:  A Breath of Life: Pulsations (Johnny Lorenz, Portuguese/Brazil) New Directions
  • Norman Manea:  The Lair (Oana Sanziana Marian, Romanian/Romania) Yale University Press
  • Herta Müller:  The Hunger Angel (Philip Boehm, German/Romania) Metropolitan Books
  • Andrés Neuman:  Traveler of the Century (Nick Caistor & Lorenza Garcia, Spanish/Argentina)Farrar, Straus, and Giroux
  • Andrey Platonov:  Happy Moscow (Robert Chandler & Elizabeth Chandler, Russian/Russia) New York Review Books
  • Noëlle Revaz:  With the Animals (Donald W. Wilson, French/Switzerland) Dalkey Archive Press
  • Mikhail Shishkin:  Maidenhair (Marian Schwartz, Russian/Russia) Open Letter Books
  • Gonçalo M. Tavares:  Joseph Walser’s Machine (Rhett McNeil, Portuguese/Portugal) Dalkey Archive Press
  • Albert Vigoleis Thelen:  Island of Second Sight (Donald O. White, German/Germany) Overlook
  • Enrique Vila-Matas:  Dublinesque (Rosalind Harvey & Anne McLean, Spanish/Spain) New Directions
  • Abdourahman A. Waberi:  Transit (David Ball & Nicole Ball, French/Djibouti) Indiana University Press
  • Urs Widmer:  My Father’s Book (Donal McLaughlin, German/Switzerland) Seagull Books

Of the three books I’ve read:   I loved My Two Worlds (published in 2011 by Open Letter) and am looking forward to Chejfec’s next book, The Dark, due out later this year.  But the things I loved about My Two Worlds – the meandering nature of the prose reflected in the landscape of the park through which the narrator walks, being trapped in another person’s head, the hints at a story that never fully resolves itself – didn’t work as well in The Planets.  Perhaps my expectations were set too high… I just didn’t enjoy it as much.  I don’t expect it to make the shortlist.  The same for Herta Müller’s The Hunger Angel.  While the writing is beautiful, I’ve heard it’s not her best book and when put head-to-head with the other longlist titles I’m not sure it will move forward.

If I were to vote for one book to win at this point it would be The Colonel.  Fantastic, challenging, amazing.  There’s no doubt in my mind that this is a significant book.

As for the rest of the list:
I attended a reading with Noëlle Revaz for With the Animals at last years’ PEN World Voices Festival in New York City.  It was torturous.  There was a translator who was there to translate the author’s answers to questions and to read from the book, but she wasn’t given her own microphone.  The result was that most of the event was in French, the attempts at translating were labored and slow, and the whole thing was just painful for the audience members who only spoke English.  The highlight came when a woman in the audience screamed parts of her questions/observations in French.  I kind of vaguely remember her dropping the F-bomb a few times.  Obviously, this has nothing to do with With the Animals being long- or short-listed – yet even that tenuous connection has me buying a copy to see what it’s about.

I’ve ordered copies of Atlas and The Map and the Territory (the UK edition which I’ve heard is covered in bubble wrap!) and am looking forward to reading them both asap.  I’ve also heard good things about both Satantango and Maidenhair and expect both to be shortlisted – which means there’s a little more time to get to them.

That’s all I’ll be able to get to before the shortlist comes out.

If you’re looking for more news and conversation regarding the Best Translated Book Award, there’s a  discussion happening at The Mookse and the Gripes free forum.  Also, the most recent episode of the Three Percent Podcast discusses all the longlisted titles.  Do you have a favorite for the prize?

*Well, actually – my initial reactions was “For F$#@ sake, they could only get it down to 25 books???!”

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An Interview with Margaret Carson

Margaret Carson is a fixture in the NYC translation community.  Most readers probably know her from her gorgeous translation of Sergio Chejfec’s My Two Worlds but (to quote her Words Without Borders biography) she’s also translated fiction by  “José Manuel Prieto, and Matilde Daviu, plays by Virgilio Piñera and Griselda Gambaro, and poetry by Mercedes Roffé and Nancy Morejón”.  She’s a member of the PEN Translation Committee and a fierce advocate for translators and translated literature .

BSR:  Margaret, thank you so much for offering to answer some questions.  We keep bumping into each other at NYC literary events – always to do with translations.  It seems to me that there is a very active community of translators in Manhattan.  I wonder if you might talk about that?

MC:  Yes, there’s a lot going on in New York! And lots of the action in international literature is happening at small independent bookstores, which are run and staffed by book lovers whose enthusiasms happily extend to works in translation.

There’s at least one reading series in New York that specializes in translations (the Bridge Series, run by Bill Martin and Sal Robinson at McNally Jackson Bookstore), frequent readings and presentations by foreign authors all over town, events sponsored by universities, book festivals featuring international literature, and plenty more. Hardly a week goes by when there’s not some event that touches on literature in translation.

BSR:  Do you think translators should be involved in the promotion of translated/international literature?

MC:  Literary translators have a lot to add to the mix. Some of us are already active on the literary scene, helping to promote books in translation, and we’re wondering what else we can do. How do we get more recognition for our work and build a reputation? It’s still sadly true that many times the names of translators don’t appear on book covers, and book reviewers often fail to mention the translator or to comment on his or her work in the body of the review. Translation is basically taking apart and rewriting a book in another language, and many of us wish that reviewers would engage more with that.

BSR:  We first met after the ‘Walker in the City’ panel at the Brooklyn Book Festival, – which you and Sergio Chejfec were a part of.  It’s my understanding, and please correct me if I’m wrong, that not all translators have the type of access or personal relationship that you’ve had with Sergio Chejfec.   Do you think knowing the author as a person – in addition to knowing his work – influenced your translations (particularly since a auto-biographic component seems to inform Chejfec’s writing)?

MC:  The response to My Two Worlds has been terrific. Lots of credit goes to Open Letter for getting the book out there and for building up a readership base for Sergio Chejfec. The fact that Sergio lives in New York and is willing to get involved in the translation and promotion of his books has also helped. Of course, it’s a great novel and deserves the attention, but you never know what path a book will take after it’s published, especially a translation.

Most of the authors I’ve worked with have been extremely generous about answering questions. In the case of Sergio, I was new to his work and that added to the challenge. Sometimes my queries were not so much linguistic (“what does this word or phrase mean?”) as they were about how a sentence was developing, what the thought was behind it. It’s often reassuring when you’re translating to feel that something is clicking into place, that you “got it” in English. But on the other hand you realize that when something clicks it may be because it’s a predictable solution, something commonplace in English, and you ask yourself: would a writer whose subject matter includes the experience of language itself want this to be so neat? Answer: no, so you have to go back and make your English do more, even going beyond what seems “correct.”

About the autobiographical elements: I was careful to put a distance between the first-person narrator of My Two Worlds and Sergio Chejfec, the author. Maybe they’re similar in some ways, and it was helpful, for example, to see and handle the Art Deco cigarette lighter that’s described at one point in the novel, but I enjoy the fictional artifice. With his essays, though, it’s different. Recently I’ve been working on an essay in which Sergio tells the story of his last name and talks about his father. It’s clearly a non-fictional space with another kind of exploration, nothing like the fiction.

BSR:  Do you have an opinion as to why Argentina seems to be such a hotbed of authors?  It seems that everywhere you look a new Argentine author (or a new edition of an old book) is being published.   Of course there is Borges & Cortázar… but there’s also César Aira, Sergio Chejfec, Eduardo Sacheri, Juan José Saer… just to name a few.

MC:  There’s great literature all over Latin America, but yes, Argentina has an extraordinary literary tradition. I’m not sure what factors explain it, but at least when I was in Buenos Aires a few years ago, there were plenty of bookstores, large and small, as well as cafés where people can read, write and talk about books, all signs of a healthy book culture, along with a remarkable number of individuals who seem to have read everything. That doesn’t explain why there’s been great literature in Argentina, but it seems like a necessary condition. And keep in mind that we’ve only seen a small part of that literature—the part that gets translated into English.

BSR:  How do you feel about the future of translation and translated literature in the U.S.?  To me it appears like translations and international books are showing up in more bookshops and getting more attention every year.  I have no hard evidence to back that up, though.

MC:  Neither do I, but your question made me take a look in four bookstores within walking distance of each other in the Village — St. Mark’s Bookstore, McNally Jackson, Three Lives, and NYU’s bookstores. I admit, not a very representative sample of bookstores across the U.S., but I was heartened to see that a good number of translations were on the front table or equivalent. We still need some hard evidence, but I think your impression is correct.

My question to you: do you think bookstores should group translations together, or should they be part of the general mix of books?

BSR:  Hey I thought I was supposed to ask the questions! 🙂  But, since you asked – I think translations need to be shelved with the general mix of books.  We both attended that panel at the PEN World Lit Festival this past April on Reviewing Translations – and I think we’re in agreement that the translators name should be right on the cover with the author’s.  After that, though, I don’t think it’s a good idea to separate translated books out of the general population.  Most readers are just looking for a good book, maybe in a specific genre, but I believe there are very few readers who browse for books by specific languages.  Though that would be kinda’ awesome.  I’d love to walk into a bookshop and say “I’m in the mood for something… I don’t know…. Japanese.  What do you recommend?”  I might just try that next time I’m in McNally Jackson.

Now, back to my questions.  As a member of the PEN Translation Committee have you seen a greater appreciation, demand for translations and/or skilled translators?

MC:  I think there’s an increased demand for great translations, though there’s no consensus on what that means. And also an increased demand for re-translations. But those are general observations, not really related to my being on the PEN Translation Committee. Our central concerns there are to advocate for the translator, to increase his or her visibility, and to raise awareness of literary translation on the whole.

BSR:  How do you accomplish that?  Are there any events planned that readers can attend or participate in?

MC:  And here I’d like to mention two panels coming up this fall the PEN Translation Committee has organized to help carry out these aims:

The first will be at the Brooklyn Book Festival on Sunday, September 23, and will highlight recent translations into English of poetry and fiction from North Africa (exact time to be announced).

The second will be on Thursday, October 4 during the ALTA (American Literary Translators Association) conference at the University of Rochester. We’re assembling a panel made up of people from the world of publishing, book reviewing and book selling, to discuss how translators can best navigate the literary landscape and collaborate in the marketing of their translations.

BSR:  Thank you again for answering my questions!  I guess we’ll be seeing each other at this year’s Brooklyn Book Festival.

MC:  Thanks so much for this chance to talk to you!

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I HEART McNALLY JACKSON

Every so often I take a trip into NYC to visit friends.  Ostensibly.  My friends would probably tell you that every so often I take a trip into NYC to drag them from one indie bookshop to another.   (No one complains, but I have detected some good-natured eye rolling. I’m always the first to say that I’m VERY fortunate in my friends).

In honor of the upcoming BookExpo America and the affiliated Book Bloggers Convention (see the sidebar) I’ll be highlighting some  of my favorite NYC Indie Bookshops during the month of May… the first of which is McNally Jackson on Prince Street.

I was over-the-moon excited to discover this new bookshop only 2 weeks ago on one of those aforementioned visits.  How did I find it?  Thank you for asking!  You see, I needed a raincoat.  My BGF and I headed for Soho to do some thrift shopping – and on the way we dropped into the RRL Ralph Lauren Men’s  Store (just because it’s awesome).   I asked a sales person  where the nearest bookshop was located.  He told us to stay on Prince and we’d find one a few blocks down on our left… which is exactly what happened!  (Lesson:  NEVER hesitate to ask locals for recommendations or directions.  New Yorker’s love their city, and love to share it).

So why, on such a short acquaintance, am I singing the praises of McNally Jackson?  Is it the cafe? The comfy chairs conveniently located everywhere?  The blog or the list of author events that has me envious of the locals able to attend on a whim?  What about the nifty bookmark that conveniently has space on the back for notes? (I am a complete bookmark snob, by the way, and McNally Jackson’s is in my Top 10).

Actually, it’s all those things.  Added to that, McNally Jackson has a fantastic selection of International Literature.  International Lit seems to be their niche, with the shelves in fiction organized by authors’ home country.  If you can’t find what you’re looking for their staff is incredibly knowledgeable and friendly.  They patiently helped me track down a copy of Ismail’s Kadare’s Three Arched Bridge (shelved in European Fiction).  I was also looking for Censoring An Iranian Love Story by Shahriar Mandanipour.  They looked it up on their computer and found out it was between hardcover and paperback printings – the paperback is due out in June, which they offered to pre-order for me. (I managed to score a used copy at the Housing Works before catching my bus home).  I rounded out my purchases with Hilary Mantel’s Eight Months on Ghazzah Street which I was able to find all by myself in British Fiction.

McNally Jackson now forms the third part of what I have dubbed the “Bookshop Triumvirate” – along with The Housing Works Used Bookshop on Crosby Street and The Strand on Broadway.

And remember that raincoat?  Well, my BGF refused to let me leave the city without one.  She found me a short, military style jacket in a trench material that fit perfectly.  I wasn’t kidding, I really am lucky when it comes to friends.

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