Beatitude Blog Tour: Interview with Author Larry Closs

My review last week made it pretty obvious how much I loved Beatitude.  So when TNBBC’s The Next Best Book Blog asked if I wanted to take part in a book tour I said yes.  I had the opportunity to ask Larry some questions about his novel, his connection to the Beat generation, and where the hell he got not one, but TWO previously unpublished … Continue reading Beatitude Blog Tour: Interview with Author Larry Closs

Don’t Forget the Poems

There was a quote from Lyndall Gordon’s Lives Like Loaded Guns: Emily Dickinson and Her Family’s Feuds, describing the poems.  I wasn’t able to fit it into my review of the book. A Dickinson poem can open out into any number of dramas to fill its compelling spaces.  As a woman unmodified by mating, a stranger to her time, speaking for those who are not … Continue reading Don’t Forget the Poems

Blog Tour: The Secret ‘Inner’ Life of Emily Dickinson by Jerome Charyn

The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson: A Novel is Jerome Charyn’s love letter to the poet.  He admits as much in his author’s note.  His attachment is not unusual.  Others have attempted  first person, fictionalized accounts of Dickinson’s life.  What is astonishing is the skill with which he assumes the voice of the poet, completely capturing the ferocity of her attachments and the violence in … Continue reading Blog Tour: The Secret ‘Inner’ Life of Emily Dickinson by Jerome Charyn

Tuesday’s Child is Full of Grace

October 7th the Forward Poetry Prize winners were announced.  It’s a poetry competition held in the UK.  The  categories include Best Collection, Best First Collection and Best Single Poem.  The Best Single Poem went to Julia Copus for her poem “An Easy Passage”. …What can she know of the way the world admits us less and less the more we grow? For now both girls … Continue reading Tuesday’s Child is Full of Grace

By Heart: Poetry, Prison, and Two Lives by Judith Tannenbaum & Spoon Jackson

Memoirs are, in my opinion, suspect. Post-modernism has labeled the majority of narrators as unreliable.   Anyone viewing the events of their life through the lens of memory is seeing history distorted.   We lack the ability to be objective about ourselves, at least not in any real way.  I am therefore mistrustful of  memoirs  and find them difficult reading – a constant sifting through of opinions, … Continue reading By Heart: Poetry, Prison, and Two Lives by Judith Tannenbaum & Spoon Jackson