*’Thirst, thirst… I’m thirsty.’

…Thirst, his third book to be translated into English, assumes a cultural awareness as well. Dowlatabadi remains a modern anomaly in that he does not cater to an American – or even a Western – audience. His novels are written in Persian and, with the exception of The Colonel (which remains censored in Iran), intended to be read by his fellow countrymen. The resulting aesthetic is very different from what most Western readers are accustomed to. Continue reading *’Thirst, thirst… I’m thirsty.’

Children in Reindeer Woods by Kristín Ómarsdóttir (translated from Icelandic by Lytton Smith)

Remember Björk?  The trippy videos, the swan dress, Dancer in the Dark… I used to think of her as an artist marching to the beat of her own drum.  In a word: “Quirky”.  But as I continue my exploration of Icelandic literature I’ve come to believe that she might be a fairly typical example of the Icelandic population.  Really, comparatively tame. Take, for example, Kristín … Continue reading Children in Reindeer Woods by Kristín Ómarsdóttir (translated from Icelandic by Lytton Smith)

Not Untrue & Not Unkind by Ed O’Loughlin (Advance Review Copy)

I suppose the plot of Not Untrue & Not Unkind went sideways for me at the end of chapter 3, when it suddenly became something unexpected.  Zaire is falling apart. The tight-knit band of journalists at the center of the story head in the direction of the abandoned presidential villa in search of some “bang-bang” (cant for “action” or “fighting”).  At least that is what … Continue reading Not Untrue & Not Unkind by Ed O’Loughlin (Advance Review Copy)