The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating: A True Story by Elisabeth Tova Bailey

I’m embarrassed to say that I picked up my copy of Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s memoir at last years Book Expo, and waited until now to read it.  It seems to have become something of a sleeper hit.  First, I heard Michael Kindness review it on the podcast Books On the Nightstand.  Then there was a write-up in the NYRB.   And then I saw it featured at the local Barnes & Noble.  Memoirs are not my usual choice in reading material.  But this isn’t the typical memoir.  What is unusual about The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating is Bailey’s decision to turn the focus away from herself and the illness that kept her bedridden.  Instead she focuses on the moment-to-moment existence of a small, wild snail brought to her in a pot of violets by a friend.

The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating is how I imagine the journals of a 19th century amateur Naturalist would read.  Bailey has no scientific training, at least none she thinks worth mentioning.   She first takes note of her snail when she finds small, square holes in the corner of a letter on her bedside table. Realizing that the snail has been eating the paper at night she experiments with feeding it flower petals. Through trial and error Bailey learns how to care for her new companion. The snail moves from a flower pot to a full terrarium, graduates from being fed decayed petals to Portobello mushroom slices – and Bailey’s observations begin in earnest (the serious research would begin years later). Eating habits, slime, reproduction, predators – there is much more to a snail’s life than you have ever cared to imagine. Even snail sex is unexpectedly intriguing.

During the summer months, if conditions become too dry, windy, or hot, or if food supplies are limited, a snail will go into a kind of dormancy called estivation. It climbs up a plant, tree, or wall to be away from the earth’s heat and beyond reach of predators or floodwaters. Finding a safe place, it attaches itself firmly with mucus, usually with the shell opening facing upward, which may alert it to weather changes. Then it seals up its entrance with a temporary door made of mucus. This storm door, called an epiphragm, protects it from shifts in temperature and humidity. A snail may estivate for weeks or months, or even several years.

… Their [an epiphragm’s] design is specific to a snail’s species and to its local climate conditions. They may be thin and simple or thick and elaborate. Strategically located breathing holes may be incorporated, or they may be permeable to air. There is quite n art to the construction of these little doors, and justly so. Despite their temporary nature, a good door in severe weather makes the difference between life and death for a snail. An epiphragm is also personal, and its statement is definitive: the snail is home but is not accepting visitors.

Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s book is distinguished by a complete absence of background noise.  Her prose is built on silence.  She transports the reader into her recovery room, – where there is no television, computer or cellphone.  Visitors feel like an intrusion on our solitude, interrupting the rhythm of our day-to-day routine.  I felt somewhat resentful towards anything that took my attention away from what was happening inside the terrarium.

Completely engrossing, and often soothing, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating is a monument to restraint.  Equally intriguing as what Bailey tells us is what she chooses not to.  Her illness is left unidentified until the epilogue, when it could easily have carried the narrative. It is the reason she was bedridden, unable to tolerate bright lights or loud noises, or to sit up for even short periods of time. But that was not the story she decided to tell. Instead she focused on another life which she came to see as a kindred spirit. The result is beautiful and evocative, the rare book written with scientific precision and a touch of poetry.

Where’er he dwells, he dwells alone,
Except himself he chattels none,
Well satisfied to be his own
Whole Treasure.

– William Cowper, from “The Snail”, 1731

(Wonderful quotes like this one are used as chapter headings throughout the book).

Publisher:  Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, New York (2010)
ISBN:  978 1 56512 606 0

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Oh yeah, that other book Michael Pollan wrote…

Garden books and winter go together.  After the garden has been covered over,  – first by autumn leaves, then frost, and finally a dusting of snow – what’s left for a gardener to do until March but read?

Of course, by now someone has told you that you HAVE to pick up a copy of The Omnivore’s Dilemma (if you haven’t already).  But before The Omnivore’s Dilemma; before “Eat Food.  Not Too Much.  Mostly Plants.” was made into a bumper sticker; before he wrote the letter telling the Obama’s to plant veggies on the White House lawn;  before all that Michael Pollan wrote a book called Second Nature:  A Gardener’s Education.  And by any standard it was, and remains, a beautiful piece of writing.

With the harvest moon, which usually arrives towards the end of September, the garden steps over into that sweet, melancholy season when ripe abundance mingles with auguries of the end anyone can read.  Except, perhaps, some of the tropical annuals, which seem to bloom only more madly the closer the frost comes.  Mindless of winter’s approach and the protocols of dormancy, the dahlia and the marigold, the tomato and basil, make no provision for frost, which might be a month away, or a day.  The annuals in September practice none of the inward turning of the hardy perennials, which you can see slowing down, taking no chances, turning their attention from blossom and leaf to root and stashed starch.  But instead of battening down the hatches, saving something for another day, the annuals throw themselves at the thinning sun, open-armed and ingenuous.  On those early autumn days when frost hangs in the air like a sword of Damocles, evident as sunlight to the lowest creature, is there anything more poignant than a dahlia’s blithe, foolhardy bloom?

Divided into four parts, conveniently corresponding to the four seasons, Second Nature was chosen by the American Horticultural Society as one of the seventy-five greatest gardening books written.  It was the book that put Michael Pollan’s blip on the radar.

Pollan’s attraction, in part, is his laid back take on the environment.  Consider: Eat Food.  Not Too Much. Mostly Plants. Not exactly the rallying cry of St. Crispin’s Day, is it?  Pollan has always struck me as the X-Generation’s environmentalist:  Eating his sushi at Nobu. Planting a tree only to find out after the fact he’s put in an invasive species.  Refusing to bow down at the altar of composting (an act he admits borders on heresy in some circles).  Or, my personal favorite, smirking at the pretensions of Thoreau playing at hermit in the forest.  Pollan makes environmentalism accessible to the masses.

Second Nature is the rare gardening/environmental book in that it is concerned with the real work of gardening. What many see as mundane tasks – mowing the lawn, weeding, composting and planting  – these gain greater social and political significance in Pollan’s hands.  He shows them to be more than simple acts which result in pretty landscapes or homegrown tomatoes in summer.  Second Nature calls upon readers to form a backyard environmental movement.

At the same time it provides a visceral scrapbook of what happens inside of a garden, embracing the Sisyphean cycle of planting, growing, harvest and death that is repeated yearly in backyards across the country.  Pollan’s genius is that he views the garden as both a micro- and  macrocosm.  Like Voltaire, he urges us to tend to our own garden. But he also applies this same philosophy to our greater environmental concerns.   He points out that, having taken the step to cultivate the earth, we have taken on the responsibility of managing it.   We  have insinuated ourselves into nature, irrevocably altering the “natural” course, which means we cannot step out and expect an anthropomorphized version of “Nature” to step back in as if there had been no interruption.  We cannot make the mistake of romanticizing nature, the virgin forest or the primeval landscape.  We must learn to work with what we have… what in many ways we have wrought.  Ultimately, the habits which make a good gardener, he believes, will make good environmentalists.

The gardener doesn’t take it for granted that man’s impact on nature will always be negative.  Perhaps he’s observed how his own garden has made this path of land a better place, even by nature’s own standards.  His gardening has greatly increased the diversity and abundance of life in this place.  Besides the many exotic species of plants he’s introduced, the mammal, rodent, and insect populations have burgeoned, and his soil supports a much  richer community of microbes than it did before….

The gardener doesn’t feel that by virtue of the fact that he changes nature he is somehow outside of it.  He looks around and sees the human hopes and desires are by now part and parcel of the landscape.  The “environment” is not, and has never been, a neutral, fixed backdrop; it is in fact alive, changing all the time in response to innumerable contingencies, one of these being the presence within it of the gardener.  And that presence is neither inherently good now bad.

By constantly shifting his perspective from the forest to the trees and back again, Pollan provides a larger action plan which can be implemented at a truly grass-roots level.  The genius is that he does so without ever stepping outside of his own garden.  In Second Nature he is not an environmental prophet, but another pilgrim on the journey. Sometimes misstepping, yet still doggedly making his way.  Trowel in hand.

It’s Monday… & January is Gardening Month!

Yeah, yeah… it’s cold and windy and snowy out here on the East Coast.  Probably not everyone’s idea of perfect gardening weather, but stay with me on this for a minute.   Seed catalogs have started arriving in the mail.  I went out and bought some graph paper to figure out what’s going where.  No weeding needs to be done yet.  Sure no planting either, but we’ve got the glass is half full mentality over here at BookSexy.  And what better way is there to beat the cold than to start planning a Summer vegetable garden?

With that in mind I posted my review of Heirloom: Notes from an Accidental Tomato Farmer last night.  And I’m 43 pages into Second Nature: A Gardener’s Education by Michael Pollan (2 out of 3  gardeners say they prefer colons over other marks of punctuation).  The authors have radically different writing styles, but both are wonderful reads.

And as for the Seed Savers Exchange Catalog – I’ve been through that at least 5 times.  It’s now got more dog-eared pages than the Christmas edition of the Sears catalog did when I was 10-years old.  Keep your White Christmas, this is what I’m dreaming of…

Tomato, Cream Sausage

Catalog #1314 (a.k.a. Banana Cream) A unique colored variety.  Bred by Thomas Wagner.  Creamy white to light yellow sausage-shaped fruit, very productive bushy plants do not require staking.  Meaty, nice sweet flavor, great for salsa and for a fabulously colored sauce!  Determinate, 80 days.

And don’t forget to visit J. Kaye’s Book Blog to see what everyone else is dreaming about.

Heirloom: Notes From an Accidental Tomato Farmer by Tim Stark

Every year since owning my own home I’ve grown vegetables in the backyard.  My garden is not for the faint of heart.  The plants start from seeds in the sun room and by mid-July I have a small ecosystem to rival a Brazilian rainforest in the yard.  Carrots, bush beans, thyme, mint, rosemary, peppers, lavender, broccoli, eggplant… all manage to cohabit amiably until the tomatoes take over.  Once those bad boys start sprouting all bets are off.  We refer to my 6 x 9 foot patch of produce as “the heart of darkness” and a chicken wire fence is all that stands between us and it.  Take my word for it, Pennsylvania is a primo spot for tomato growing.

Tim Stark figured this out back in 1994.  He started growing his tomato seedlings under florescent lights in a Brooklyn apartment and after getting booted by his landlord took them home to the family farm in Pennsylvania.  “Farm” is putting it generously – he has 2 acres dedicated to growing which, by his own account, he does not own.  But what he grows on those 2 acres get shipped every week to the Union Square Greenmarket in NYC.  His tomatoes have made him a favorite of chefs throughout the city.

Heirloom: Notes from an Accidental Tomato Farmer is not an account of his journey from PA to Brooklyn and back again.  It’s no more or less than what the title claims – a mishmash of anecdotes put together from 14+ years of farming without chemicals in Pennsylvania and selling the produce in Manhattan.  (There’s a whole archive of articles that didn’t make the cut over at Gourmet.com).  What makes these anecdotes matter is that, in addition to being a damn good writer, Stark sees himself as a farmer.  And being a farmer isn’t the easiest job out there these days.  That edge creeps in.  This isn’t Garrison Keillor or some heartwarming pioneer family mini-series on the Hallmark Channel.  Stark’s stories are about farming in the 20th/21st century, with its ups and downs, gains and losses.  He’s also a bit of a crank.  He complains his way through much of the book… About not being accepted by the other farmers in his area.  About farmers competing with Real Estate developers for farmland.  About what the government charges and the paperwork it requires before you can call your produce “organic”.  About readers of Gourmet sending him hate mail after the magazine published his story about killing a groundhog as he deals with un-diagnosed lyme disease (add hypochondriac to his possible sins).  Stark’s crankiness is a big part of what makes his storytelling so much fun.

Knowing I was broke from buying a tractor and from buying all of the material that went into constructing the greenhouse, they (his Mennonite neighbor, neighbor’s son, brother and father, who all showed up seemingly unannounced one Spring day to help Stark put up his greenhouse) refused to accept payment for their services.  And I wasn’t even a member of their church.  So I tried to be a sport… I threw myself into the next job that had been lined up for the crew: putting the roof on a barn.  I found myself fifty feet up, clinging to a roof beam, cowering and dropping nails to the ground as all around me Mennonites young and old tromped along without the slightest fear in the world.  I hung in there for about forty-five minutes, nervously pounding a nail or two, clinging to dear life and dropping three nails for every one that I pounded in.  When I finally said enough was enough, maneuvering over to the ladder and climbing down to safety, everybody up on the roof thanked me with such sincerity that, in view of my tiny, cowering contribution, I decided they could only have been thanking me for not falling and breaking my neck and leaving them with a real predicament on their hands.

Parenthesis mine.

It’s when Stark switches the focus off himself, his farm, and his experiences that Heirloom becomes a bit lackluster.  An example would be in the very first chapter where he spends too much time on the story of the failed farmer who was the de facto caretaker of Eckerton Farm when Stark moved there as a child.  We’re supposed to see a parallel between the lives of Milt Miller & Tim Stark, but while I understand that the author feels some kinship to the man I never completely buy into it – or into the bigger picture Stark is trying to paint.

Tim Stark is best when he remembers to be Tim Stark… not Michael Pollan.  When he remembers that readers want to hear about his first year growing tomatoes at Eckerton, of a hellish day spent delivering snap beans door-to-door to NYC restaurants, or selling chile peppers to West Indians.  Chapters that start with sentences such as ‘It was inevitable that we would come to be labeled as “the tomato people”…’  “My wife – the farmer’s wife, always sticking her nose where she got no bidness…”  “The bucket on my tractor snapped when I tried to clear the snow that finally stopped falling at noon on Valentine’s Day…”  are the ones that really sing.  Stark still gets his point across and his message out just as clearly as does Pollan, just in his own voice (which, in my opinion, feels more relevant).

Overall, the book is a winner.  I enjoyed it so much that I recommend going online to check out that archive of articles on Gourmet.com (if you haven’t found them already).  And since Condé Nast is closing the magazine, the clock just may be ticking on that.  Hopefully that means they’ll have to publish a follow-up to Heirloom.