It’s Monday… & January is Gardening Month!

Yeah, yeah… it’s cold and windy and snowy out here on the East Coast.  Probably not everyone’s idea of perfect gardening weather, but stay with me on this for a minute.   Seed catalogs have started arriving in the mail.  I went out and bought some graph paper to figure out what’s going where.  No weeding needs to be done yet.  Sure no planting either, but we’ve got the glass is half full mentality over here at BookSexy.  And what better way is there to beat the cold than to start planning a Summer vegetable garden?

With that in mind I posted my review of Heirloom: Notes from an Accidental Tomato Farmer last night.  And I’m 43 pages into Second Nature: A Gardener’s Education by Michael Pollan (2 out of 3  gardeners say they prefer colons over other marks of punctuation).  The authors have radically different writing styles, but both are wonderful reads.

And as for the Seed Savers Exchange Catalog – I’ve been through that at least 5 times.  It’s now got more dog-eared pages than the Christmas edition of the Sears catalog did when I was 10-years old.  Keep your White Christmas, this is what I’m dreaming of…

Tomato, Cream Sausage

Catalog #1314 (a.k.a. Banana Cream) A unique colored variety.  Bred by Thomas Wagner.  Creamy white to light yellow sausage-shaped fruit, very productive bushy plants do not require staking.  Meaty, nice sweet flavor, great for salsa and for a fabulously colored sauce!  Determinate, 80 days.

And don’t forget to visit J. Kaye’s Book Blog to see what everyone else is dreaming about.

Heirloom: Notes From an Accidental Tomato Farmer by Tim Stark

Every year since owning my own home I’ve grown vegetables in the backyard.  My garden is not for the faint of heart.  The plants start from seeds in the sun room and by mid-July I have a small ecosystem to rival a Brazilian rainforest in the yard.  Carrots, bush beans, thyme, mint, rosemary, peppers, lavender, broccoli, eggplant… all manage to cohabit amiably until the tomatoes take over.  Once those bad boys start sprouting all bets are off.  We refer to my 6 x 9 foot patch of produce as “the heart of darkness” and a chicken wire fence is all that stands between us and it.  Take my word for it, Pennsylvania is a primo spot for tomato growing.

Tim Stark figured this out back in 1994.  He started growing his tomato seedlings under florescent lights in a Brooklyn apartment and after getting booted by his landlord took them home to the family farm in Pennsylvania.  “Farm” is putting it generously – he has 2 acres dedicated to growing which, by his own account, he does not own.  But what he grows on those 2 acres get shipped every week to the Union Square Greenmarket in NYC.  His tomatoes have made him a favorite of chefs throughout the city.

Heirloom: Notes from an Accidental Tomato Farmer is not an account of his journey from PA to Brooklyn and back again.  It’s no more or less than what the title claims – a mishmash of anecdotes put together from 14+ years of farming without chemicals in Pennsylvania and selling the produce in Manhattan.  (There’s a whole archive of articles that didn’t make the cut over at Gourmet.com).  What makes these anecdotes matter is that, in addition to being a damn good writer, Stark sees himself as a farmer.  And being a farmer isn’t the easiest job out there these days.  That edge creeps in.  This isn’t Garrison Keillor or some heartwarming pioneer family mini-series on the Hallmark Channel.  Stark’s stories are about farming in the 20th/21st century, with its ups and downs, gains and losses.  He’s also a bit of a crank.  He complains his way through much of the book… About not being accepted by the other farmers in his area.  About farmers competing with Real Estate developers for farmland.  About what the government charges and the paperwork it requires before you can call your produce “organic”.  About readers of Gourmet sending him hate mail after the magazine published his story about killing a groundhog as he deals with un-diagnosed lyme disease (add hypochondriac to his possible sins).  Stark’s crankiness is a big part of what makes his storytelling so much fun.

Knowing I was broke from buying a tractor and from buying all of the material that went into constructing the greenhouse, they (his Mennonite neighbor, neighbor’s son, brother and father, who all showed up seemingly unannounced one Spring day to help Stark put up his greenhouse) refused to accept payment for their services.  And I wasn’t even a member of their church.  So I tried to be a sport… I threw myself into the next job that had been lined up for the crew: putting the roof on a barn.  I found myself fifty feet up, clinging to a roof beam, cowering and dropping nails to the ground as all around me Mennonites young and old tromped along without the slightest fear in the world.  I hung in there for about forty-five minutes, nervously pounding a nail or two, clinging to dear life and dropping three nails for every one that I pounded in.  When I finally said enough was enough, maneuvering over to the ladder and climbing down to safety, everybody up on the roof thanked me with such sincerity that, in view of my tiny, cowering contribution, I decided they could only have been thanking me for not falling and breaking my neck and leaving them with a real predicament on their hands.

Parenthesis mine.

It’s when Stark switches the focus off himself, his farm, and his experiences that Heirloom becomes a bit lackluster.  An example would be in the very first chapter where he spends too much time on the story of the failed farmer who was the de facto caretaker of Eckerton Farm when Stark moved there as a child.  We’re supposed to see a parallel between the lives of Milt Miller & Tim Stark, but while I understand that the author feels some kinship to the man I never completely buy into it – or into the bigger picture Stark is trying to paint.

Tim Stark is best when he remembers to be Tim Stark… not Michael Pollan.  When he remembers that readers want to hear about his first year growing tomatoes at Eckerton, of a hellish day spent delivering snap beans door-to-door to NYC restaurants, or selling chile peppers to West Indians.  Chapters that start with sentences such as ‘It was inevitable that we would come to be labeled as “the tomato people”…’  “My wife – the farmer’s wife, always sticking her nose where she got no bidness…”  “The bucket on my tractor snapped when I tried to clear the snow that finally stopped falling at noon on Valentine’s Day…”  are the ones that really sing.  Stark still gets his point across and his message out just as clearly as does Pollan, just in his own voice (which, in my opinion, feels more relevant).

Overall, the book is a winner.  I enjoyed it so much that I recommend going online to check out that archive of articles on Gourmet.com (if you haven’t found them already).  And since Condé Nast is closing the magazine, the clock just may be ticking on that.  Hopefully that means they’ll have to publish a follow-up to Heirloom.

The Monday After Christmas…

It’s December 28th and here’s a list of what Santa dropped off at our house this year.

  • Heirloom: Notes from an Accidental Tomato Farmer by Tim Stark – So far I’m really enjoying this book.  Basically, Stark began farming heirloom tomatoes in Pennsylvania and selling them to chefs at NYC’s Union Square Greenmarket.  Interesting reading particularly for vegetable gardeners.  Fortuitously, my Seed Savers Exchange catalog arrived a few weeks ago and March is right around the corner!  A great way to escape the ice and snow.
  • The Ventriloquist’s Tale by Pauline Melville – I am so excited about this book!  It was Melville’s first novel and winner of the 1997 Whitbread First Novel Award.  I took a peek at the Prologue, which establishes the narrator in a way that is surprisingly similar to Eating Air.
  • Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide by Nicholas D. Kristof & Sheryl WuDunn – A recent issue of The New York Review of Books had an article on this book which caught my interest.  The authors are a husband & wife journalist (and Pulitzer winning) team who in their travels discovered that  one of the things struggling countries have in common is the oppression of women.   In Half the Sky they explain how this kind of attitude toward women is not only morally wrong, but economically ruinous.
  • Plagues & Peoples by William H. McNeill – Originally published in 1976, Plagues & Peoples examines the effect of diseases (particularly large scale outbreaks) on history & society.   It’s covered with excerpts of rave reviews from the likes of The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books & the Washington Post.   This is a great additional to my library’s Disease shelf.
  • Interaction of Color: New Complete Edition by Josef Albers – A surprise Christmas gift, I’ve already begun flipping through the pages – but I anticipate the need for an extended sit down before I’m comfortable reviewing this gem.  The color illustrations are gorgeous and I won’t even get into how beautiful the books are, by themselves, in the slipcase.  This is one of those books that moves into the realm of an object, and if you have the opportunity to look one over in person (regardless of whether you are interested in art books) I definitely recommend doing so.

Books given as gifts are my favorite things, if only because they show as much about how the giver’s mind works as they do about the receiver’s tastes.  I’ve never been that big of a fan of the end of the year/end of the decade lists, because, let’s face it – the same books are pretty much repeated again and again.  But a list of the books exchanged over the Holidays… that’s always going to turn up something new.

Leave a comment below with what turned up under your tree (or other appropriate holiday accessory) this year…  And if you’re interested in what everyone else is reading the Monday after Christmas, stop by J. Kaye’s Book Blog for the weekly meme.